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Kids that Fidget

It can be hard for any child to sit still in classes all day long.  Let’s face it – it would be hard for most grown-ups to sit still that long.  Even with breaks, lunch, and recesses, kids are still expected to be still and quiet for long periods of time.  This becomes even more of a struggle for kids with special needs like ADHD or autism.  There are some resources that will give your children an outlet for them to fidget in a calmer manner.

Pencil Fidgets

Kids that have to be doing something with their hands with appreciate these pencil toppers.  Each of the four kinds has a long piece that fits on the pencil.  The long piece holds a shorter piece that can move up and down.  A child can sit in class with their pencil and still be able to move their hands without distracting other students or the teacher.

Stress Balls

Another help for kids that fidget is the common stress ball.  In this case, the stress ball is not just to relieve stress.  The purpose instead is simply for the child to have something to do with their hands.  Squeezing the stress ball allows children to release energy in a less active way.

Chew Objects

While some children need to move or fidget with their hands, other children need to chew on things.  If not given something specific, these students tend to bite their fingernails, chew on their pencils, or even suck on their hands.  If you child is a student like this, it may help to give them something that is specifically for them to chew on.  Companies are making chewing objects for kids that are fun and cute accessories.  Boys will like the dog tags while girls with feel pretty in a beaded necklace.

So if your child needs to fidget in class, try out one of these toys.  Maybe they need to hand movement or feeling in their mouth to help them concentrate.  Maybe the need to move or chew is completely out of their control.  Either way, these toys are resources that can help.  What other sensory toys does your child like to use?

Photo by: Kids that Fidget

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Motivating an ADHD Student

It can be hard to keep a student with ADHD motivated and working hard.  They are so prone to daydreaming that keeping them focused can be a challenge.  Their are some tricks you can use to help keep them focused and motivated as they work.

Break Work Into Smaller Chunks

Sometimes long worksheets or a whole page of math problems will overwhelm an ADHD child.  When they feel overwhelmed, they shut down and become less focused on their work.  You can solve that problem simply by splitting the same assignment into smaller sections.  Use a piece of construction paper to cover up the bottom two-thirds of the page.  Then tell your child that they can have a short break when they finish that top section.  When they finish, give them a 5 minute break before having them do the next third of the page.  Just shortening the amount of problems they have to look at all at once can help an ADHD child focus better.

Time Their Work

You can also have them race to beat their own time on each section of the paper.  As they start each section, start a timer somewhere that they can see it.  After the section, write down their time for that section.  Time them on each section and encourage them to see if they can beat their own time.  You may want to keep an eye out though for how they react to the timer.  For most children, seeing the timer will motivate them to work faster.  Some students, however, may get distracted by the timer and actually work slower.  If you find this to be the case, try putting the timer in a place that they cannot see and just telling them their end time for each section.

Give Them Caffeine

This may sound strange to say about a child, but a small amount of caffeine before an assignment or class can keep them more focused.  Of course, I don’t mean that you should give them a full cup of coffee before every class!  But if you notice that they are getting more and more distracted, give them a mini candy bar or a chocolate kiss.  You could also give them a soda during lunch to help them focus during those long afternoon classes.  The jolt of caffeine stimulates their brain and allows them to stay involved in their work instead of sleepy and daydreaming.

It is difficult to force an ADHD student to pay attention through an entire day of classes, but there are things that can help.  Talk with your child’s teacher about possibly implementing some of these ideas.  Or teach your child to use these ideas on their own.  You will see a difference in their attention before too long!  What other tricks do you use to help your ADHD student focus on their work?

Photo by:  Practical Cures

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National Frog Month – Jump Into It!

April is National Frog Month and is a special time set aside to celebrate those little fun creatures found both in urban and rural settings all over the country.  Nearly everyone has been fascinated by the development of a frog from a tadpole, listened to their croaking calls, or watched them leap in the grass or on the pond.  There are so many engaging activities for students to learn about frogs.  Books, movies, crafting activities, and even apps have been created for children to study frogs.  Teaching students about frogs in the classroom is a very interactive lesson plan that children of all ages enjoy and can be tied to many subject areas.

frog

Frog Activities Based on Books

There are many famous children’s books that have a frog as the main character.  One of my favorite series, Frog and Toad, is a collection of easy reader short stories based on the adventures of Frog and Toad.  Their traits and appearances hold true to the actual characteristics of frogs and toads.  This story would be a great lead into a lesson about the differences between frogs and toads.

Jump, Frog, Jump! is a very cute picture book that involves repetition and the life cycle.  Younger students appreciate the repetition and the rhyming while older student can use it at a spring board for learning more about frogs and other reptiles.  Kcls.org has a document of a variety of lessons for reading this picture book.

Frog Activities Based on Movies & Television

The Princess and the Frog, a Disney movie that came out in 2009, is a popular frog movie for children.  This story is a modern retelling of the Frog Prince.  Lessons for this movie can include learning about frogs, crocodiles, and lightening bugs along with connections to learning about jazz and New Orleans.  Scholastic has a website of plans and printables for lessons based on The Princess and the Frog.

National Geographic has an entire documentary style series of videos available on their website to learn about specific species of frogs like the Leopard Frog and the Bullfrog.  The videos are short and designed for kids.  There are facts sheets and links associated with each video for further exploration.

Kermit the Frog is a famous connection to frogs that kids of all ages will love to learn about.  Students can make connections between Kermit and real frogs describing the similarities and differences.  Students can also learn many academic-based lessons with the video clips of Kermit the Frog that are available online.

Frog Activities Based on Apps

One of the standard requirements for high school biology classes is to dissect a frog.  The Easy Frog Dissection app is an educational guide that allows students to dissect a real frog by viewing real images of a frog with the various organs pinpointed and explained.  This app is great for high school students to review and study or in lieu of completing an actual dissection.

Frogsaregreen.com has an online review of 5 of the top frog apps.  U.S. State Amphibians can be used to find out which frogs live in your part of the country.  Frog Flip can be used to study the variety of frogs based on their physical characteristics.  Frog Dissection is a virtual application where students can dissect frogs.  Pocket Frogs is a popular free game that students can play where they become the frog surviving through environment challenges.

Other Resources for Learning about Frogs

  1. Kid Activities – Frog Themed Lessons
  2. Harcourt School – The Life Cycle of a Frog
  3. eHow – Celebrating National Frog Month
  4. Exploratorium – Frogs (Great for middle school students)
  5. Grow-a-frog kits

Article By Laura Ketcham

Picture By kakissel

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Earth Day and Arbor Day Activities for Students

Earth Day is celebrated on April 22nd and Arbor Day is celebrated on April 29th.  Both of these nature inspired celebration days offer a chance for students to learn about the earth and trees by contributing something back to their community.  Many classrooms around the nation will be celebrating these occasions by planting trees, participating in environmental clean-ups, joining recycling programs, and other ecological related activities.

earth

Both of these events provide a great opportunity for hands-on learning in the classroom that can be bridged with almost any subject area including science, math, language arts, social studies and even PE, foreign language, art, and drama.

Reading, Writing, and Drama Lesson Idea

One great idea inspired by a teacher at my school is to read the students The Lorax.   This children’s fable was written by Dr. Seuss with imaginary creatures and personification shows how nature can be harmed by humans.  Concerns are raised about cutting down trees, polluting lakes, and air pollution caused by industrial businesses.

In small groups, students can then reflect upon these ideas and use them to compose their own environmental story for children.  Taking this lesson one step further, students could then perform a reader’s theater skit for fellow classmates based on their story.  This activity ties in with both Earth Day and Arbor Day.

Science & Art Lesson Idea

eHow.com has a great article with 3 informative and engaging lesson plan ideas for Earth Day for special needs students.

The first lesson is to have students create a compost bin.  The students can then see the process of biodegrading over time.  This compost can then be used to plant a classroom garden.  This activity gets the students active and involved outside.

The next lesson idea is to teach students about the harm plastic bags on the environment and the benefit of reusable bags.  Students then students create their own reusable bags using recycled materials and cloth.  These can then be used at home or in the classroom in lieu of plastic bags.

The most interesting lesson was to have students coat paper in petroleum jelly and then hang it in the school parking lot.  The jelly will cause all of the air pollution caused by passing cars to stick to the paper and can then be observed or even analyzed by the students.  This is a great connection into a further lesson on air pollution and how we can reduce our carbon footprint.  A banner could be used to explain the project and attract community attention to local pollution.

PE Tree Lesson Activity

A simple connection to trees and PE is through learning the “tree” yoga pose.  PE central provides a description of the activity and song suggestions for students to personify a tree.  Students are arranged in lines with enough room to stretch out and yoga mats.  They will learn tree yoga pose and then during the stretching and movements they reach up like branches, sway side to side as if the wind were blowing their leaves, and planting their feet like the trunk of a tree.

More Lesson Ideas

  1. http://www.theteachersguide.com/arbordaylessonplans.htm
  2. http://www.ehow.com/earth-day/
  3. http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson260.shtml

Article By Laura Ketcham

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iPod Touch & iPad 2 Accessories for the Classroom (Part 2)

This blog post is continued from the post last week on iPod Touch and iPad accessories for the classroom.  The first post provides examples of screen protectors, covers, cases, and stands that are useful accessories to purchase to increase the longevity and usability of the mobile devices.  This post will focus on styluses, keyboards, headphones, adaptors, and connection cables should all be considered when purchasing these portable devices.  All these accessories increase the ease of use of the devices in the classroom setting for both teachers and students.

ipad

Styluses & Keyboards

If the iPad’s are going to be used as a laptop replacement device in the classroom, it is worth the investment of Bluetooth wireless keyboards.  Students can type up documents for class more efficiently.  The onboard keyboard is useful, but it gets tedious if you have to type or edit longer documents.  Apple has a very versatile keyboard that can hold up to daily use by students.  It is slim and compact, would travel easily for a mobile classroom.  Users have rated  this is an easy to use a keyboard and is similar in layout and spacing when compared to a traditional keyboard.

The use of a stylus with the iPod Touch or the iPad is a great addition for younger students or students who may have difficulty using the touch screen method.  Many styluses are small and not made for young students. One stylus that has gotten great ratings for students is the AluPen.  Viewer ratings state that it is easy to grip, more responsive, glides smoothly, and allows for more accurate writing and drawing.

Headphones

Headphones are definitely a necessity in any computer lab, even a mobile lab.  This allows students to listen to academic-based websites like Learning Today, educational videos from TeacherTube, or sound embedded into Apps.  I required students to bring in headphones as part of their school materials at the beginning of the year.  I ask for the ear bud style headphones so they are easy to store in their backpacks.  This may not work for all students or all situations.  Some labs provide headphones to students.  They should be durable and easily sanitized after each use.  If they have headphone pads, they should be able to be cleaned or replaced.

Adaptors & Connection Cables

The iPod Touch & iPad 2 only come with a wall charger and a UBS sync cable to connect it to the computer.  These cables will not be enough to use the devices in a classroom setting.   At minimum, a digital adaptor or an AVG cable will be needed for the teacher in order to model the use of the iPad on a screen or interactive board.

For a mobile lab, there also must be a way to sync all of the devices easily at one time.  You must also have a storage device that will allow for easy transportation throughout a school.  This syncing storage device should also provide security and lock when the devices when not in use.

What are your favorite iPod Touch and iPad accessories?

Article By Laura Ketcham

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iPod Touch & iPad 2 Accessories for the Classroom (Part 1)

When purchasing iPod’s or iPad’s for the classroom, one must consider the accessories that will need to be purchased in order to exploit the power of the devices.  Screen protectors, covers, cases, stands, styluses, keyboards, headphones, adaptors, and connection cables should all be considered as necessary additions when purchasing these devices for the classroom.  Be sure to budget in these items when determining your needs for the classroom when planning to purchase.

ipad

Screen Protectors & Covers/Cases

Screen Protectors are a clear film that is stuck to the front and/or back screen of the device.  This helps to protect the screen from scratches and can even help to protect the screen if the device is dropped.  I have used InvisibleSHIELD from Zaag on both my iPhone and my iPad.  This protective cover has proven very useful in small drops, prevented my screen from shattering on a large drop, and also prevents smudges and scratches.  Another great quality of this protector is that it has a lifetime warranty.  This is great for school use because of the amount of time the devices will be used and it is replaced for free.

In addition to a screen protector, you should also buy a cover or a case.  This provides more protection for the device.  Covers can include rubber or plastic that only protects the backing of the device or one for the front of the case as well.

For example, the Griffin Reveal is a slim-line protector case that slides over the back of the device (iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad 2).  The advantage to this cover is that it doesn’t add bulk to the device, has rubber sides that make it easy to hold, and that it is made out of one piece of polycarbonate which is a strong material that can hold up to frequent use.

The iPad Smart Cover is nice, but doesn’t seem like it will hold up to use by students.  It turns off the iPad automatically when shut and is magnetically attached to the side.  It flips over to become a stand, but it isn’t very sturdy and I can see this breaking easily.   I think it is too early to tell which case will be the best for students that will provide protection along with providing the option to turn it into a stand.   Buying a case for protection and a separate stand is the better option for the classroom.

Stands

Stands are a definite extra that should considered when buying these types of devices.  This is especially useful in the special education classroom.  While buying a separate stand for home use may seem unnecessary, it is very useful in the classroom.  Stands hold the device in a leaning position so that students could use a stylus, read from it, or use in a more ergonomic fashion.  Xtand has some of the top-rated stands for both the iPod Touch and the iPad 2.  These stands are durable and more stable than the stands that fold up or are built into a case.  The one down side is that it is not easily transported as it doesn’t fold up.

The remaining accessories will be included in another post next week.  Accessories are an important component that should definitely be thought out and planned for when building a mobile lab.

Article By Laura Ketcham

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April Fool’s Day Activities for Students

This year April Fool’s Day is Friday, April 1st.  While not a traditional holiday of either gift giving or religious importance, it is still a fun day to celebrate.  Today’s traditions of April Fool’s Day revolve around playing harmless jokes on friends and family.  However, the basis of the day actually revolves around topics that are great for the classroom – learning about the calendar, the first day of spring, the change of when New Year’s is celebrated, and the historical significance of a variety of pranks that we play today.

joke

This is an especially sensitive issue as students with emotional or cognitive disabilities may not understand or become upset by the jokes or pranks that other students may be playing throughout the school day.  Making special needs students aware of April Fool’s Day is important so that the students can understand the intentions of why their peers may make jokes or play pranks They could get involved in school-appropriate April Fool’s jokes as well.  This day must be managed with sensitivity and direction to avoid mean or destructive behavior from any student.

History of April Fool’s Day

There are many resources available online geared for students to learn the history behind April Fool’s Day.

Wilstar.com, a website based on exploration of a variety of topics, has a history page devoted to April Fool’s Day.  On this page, students learn that the significance of April’s Fools Day and how it began when the calendar was updated to the Gregorian calendar.  The New Year was changed from the beginning of spring to January 1st.  The people who didn’t accept this change were considered the ‘fools’ and were made fun of for not following the new calendar.  Today, different cultures put their own twist on the day including tricking people for the entire day, holding two days of April Fool’s silliness or celebrating the day on a different day of the year.

The Franklin Institute also has a great page about teaching students about the history of April Fool’s Day.  This includes more information about the different calendar systems and the changes that were made and why they were implemented

April Fool’s Day Activities

Classroom activities for April Fool’s Day should be fun and engaging.   Playing small jokes on your students to get them motivated always works with the middle school students.  Giving the students a silly, impossible worksheet or a fake pop-quiz on pop culture are two examples. For elementary students, you can read them silly books or give them fun worksheets to learn   to learn about simple jokes and April Fool’s related vocabulary.  More activities can be found on this link to April Fool’s activities designed by teachers.

There is one “prank” that sent me into tears from laughing so hard as I was writing this blog.  I was thinking of a classroom joke to play for my students this year and I was thinking of the traditional examples given above when I came across this idea from eHow.  As a computer teacher, I can update the Google homepage, the default on computers, to search in three different ‘fun’ languages Elmer Fudd, Pirate, and Klingon.  I will do a web-related activity having these settings up on the search engine without their knowledge to have a fun time.  For each option, the main choices of searching, settings, feeling lucky, and search are all updated in the fun languages.  For example Elmer Fudd “hunts” instead of searches, and the Pirate “Sails into Port” to login.

What are you plans for April Fool’s Day?

Article by Laura Ketcham

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Using PVC Piping for Creative Classroom Solutions

Teachers are thrifty individuals who use creative thinking to provide the best learning opportunities for their students in the classroom.  In previous posts, I have written about low-cost and free resources that teachers can take advantage of in the classroom.  Another one of these low-cost tricks is to use PVC piping for a variety of classroom needs.  PVC pipe could be for practical purposes as an assistive technology device or it can be used to create interactive games and activities for students.  Examples include using it to create stands, frames, simulation devices or as a play phone, tee-pee, or marble maze.  PVC pipe can even be used to make instruments!

school

PVC pipe is made of plastic and is typically used for plumbing, sewers, and protecting wiring.  Since it is made out of plastic, it is highly durable and long-lasting.  Many different pipe diameters and joints can be adjoined together to make complex curves and shapes. PVC piping can be purchased from the local hardware stores and is relatively inexpensive.

Below are great resources to help you get started with PVC pipe designs in your classroom.

Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resource System (FDLRS) – PVC Idea & Instruction Booklet

FDLRS provides an entire workbook of resources for PVC pipe assistive technology devices for special needs students.  This resource is very extensive and a great first-timers resource.  They provide a detailed explanation of the tools that will be needed to construct the various assistive devices, provide detailed materials lists and diagrams, along with how the device can be used in the classroom.  They have over twenty different devices including stands, assistive writing tools, frames, easels, and organizers.  Each device has a level associated with the directions to determine the length of time and difficulty it will take to build the device.

If you are not a handy construction-minded teacher, this is one way that you can get fathers involved in volunteering at the school.  Many fathers always want to help, but don’t know how.  This would be a great way to get them involved in the classroom while building such useful devices for the students.

Bright Eyes Learning – PVC Pipe for Activities

Bright Eyes Learning provides ideas, examples, and instructions on how to build PVC pipe toys and activity centers for the classroom.  Some of the activities are definitive, the PVC pipe is used to build a particular toy for a particular purpose, and other activities with the PVC pipes allow the students to explore in free-play activities.

The examples from their site include making play phones, a tee-pee and a marble maze.  These examples have direct instructions including materials needed and models of what the project will look like upon completion.  The abstract examples from the site include using the PVC pipe in activities where students use them as ‘building blocks’, as a sensory device, or as a tube for exploratory games.

To make PVC pipe into an exploratory device,  you can fill a clear PVC pipe tube it with colorful nick-knacks like marbles, feathers, or glitter and then cap off the ends.  Then students can use this during play-time or to learn about colors or textures.  To explore further, the piping could be used to allow students to run various ball objects through the tubes to see what will come out first.  It could also be used as an imaginary telescope.

The ideas and uses of PVC pipe in the classroom are endless.  Have you used PVC pipe as a learning aid or tool in your classroom?  Feel free to share your experiences by commenting below!

Article by Laura Ketcham

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Opening of Baseball Season – Great Classroom Connections

As covered in many of my blog posts, students are much more engaged in learning when it is a relevant topic that they are interested in – especially if it relates to the “real world”.  The opening of baseball season, a favorite American past time, is one of these great “real world” events that can be connected into classroom curriculum.  Opening day is March 31st.

baseball

There are so many classroom connections with baseball that incorporate math, language arts, languages, geography, history, and even science and all  fit the standards-based instruction.  Here are some online resources for ideas on how you can incorporate baseball into your class curriculum.

The Teacher’s Corner – Baseball Season

The Teacher’s Corner has a wide variety of resources to teach core curriculum content in relation to baseball.  These activities are great for the elementary classroom or could be adapted for older grade levels and span across many different subject areas.  Activities include journal writing, vocabulary crosswords, figuring averages, the science of baseball, baseball-based review games for many different subjects, and problem solving.

The science of baseball activity was really fun and engaging.  Students learn about what the ‘sweet spot’ is of a baseball, how to react to and hit a fast ball, throwing a curve ball, along with other historical facts about baseball.  There are interactive activities and great animated pictures that bring the concepts to life.  The comic book style of the page will also be very engaging to middle school students and is considered very popular and current.

PBS:  The Tenth Inning

PBS has great resources for lesson plan ideas that connect with a documentary series about baseball entitled The Tenth Inning.  This video documentary chronicles the history and impact that baseball has had on society including the first black baseball player, women in baseball, and the growth of Hispanic and Asian players.  It also includes the scandals and triumphs of the baseball world from the 1990’s until today.

Among the many lessons that are found online that correlate with the video and includes “stadium consultants” where students act as the stadium managers and make choices about ticket prices and concessions, a lesson on “shadow ball” which is a warm up activity that was created by the Negro league, and “mapping baseball” where students would learn the history and growth of the baseball league.  All of the lessons I looked at were very engaging and I could see my 7th grade students really enjoying the activity and learning at the same time.

Another section on this site is “The 7th Inning Stretch”.  This page includes more open ended examples of lesson ideas including researching about the music of baseball, fantasy baseball, and the invention of the baseball.

Buddy Project

The Buddy Project has three simple lesson plans for teaching math concepts with a  baseball theme.  The first lesson incorporates the use of baseball cards.  The teacher should provide each student with a baseball card and discuss the information that is included on the back.  In this discussion the teacher would talk about the batting average and how it is calculated for each player.  The students could then be given the at-bats and number of hits so they could calculate the batting averages of some of the top players.

The next lesson has students playing math baseball on Funbrain.  This activity can be done individually or in pairs and is used as a review of basic math facts.  Students earn a base for every question they answercorrectly.  Competing against their classmates is a great way to motivate students to be more actively engaged in the activity.

The last lesson involves students solving money-based math problems in computation of salaries for baseball players.  The website provides a table of real baseball salaries and then provides a quiz based on the data table information.

All of the activities on this site have companion interactive activities that students can do online or on the interactive whiteboard in the front of the class.

Happy Opening Day!

Article by Laura Ketcham

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Voki – Creative Web Program for Students!

Voki is a free Web 2.0 website where students can create their own online avatar character that they can customize, add voice, and then publish to the Internet.  Using this website in the classroom will engage students in the learning activities offer by the website.  There are so many educational applications for this technology tool in the classroom!

voki

Using Voki in the Classroom

Voki has two pages of their site that are dedicated to using Voki in the classroom:  Voki for Education and Lesson Plans.  In the Voki for Education page, teachers can learn about what Voki is, why they should use it in the classroom, and get connected with other teachers who are using Voki.  In the Lesson Plans section, teachers can search an extensive list of lesson plans that range from kinder through high school and cover many subject areas including geography, spelling, drama, and technology.

Teachers could create Voki avatar to share with their students or even the parents.  Introducing a project, lesson, or unit with a Voki avatar really catches the interest of the students.  Teachers could also create an avatar to welcome parents to a back to school event or open house night.

Students can also create their own avatars.  The main idea of using this program would be to have the student research a specific topic and then record what they have learned to then share with the rest of the class.  For example, students can create a Voki about learning about facts of a state, explaining the steps on how to solve a math problem, or a science experiment.  In a special education classroom, students could use the avatars as a fun way of communicating in the classroom via the text to speech option.

When I used this program in my classroom, each student researched a different tab on the new Microsoft Word 2010 Ribbon.  They then wrote a script, recorded their script, and then they shared their Voki with the other students in the class via the SMART board.  This way, all of the students learned about the all of the tabs in Word 2010.  It was such an engaging assignment and the high quiz scores proved that this assignment really actively engaged them in the learning process.

How to Use Voki

Voki is very easy to use.  To begin, you select the create button, and then you can customize your avatar.  When you customize your character, you can change the style of head, hair, mouth, and facial features.  You can also change the clothing and ‘bling.’  The features of the avatar can then be made larger or smaller and the color can even be changed.  After that, I suggest that the students select the background for the avatar.  Students can choose one of the many pre-made backgrounds, or they can upload their own.

I suggest that before students start to record either their voice or using the text to speech feature, that they draft a script of what needs to be said.  This way, when recording the ideas are well thought out to meet the needs of the assignment and the avatar. They also need to keep the 1-minute time limit into consideration when writing their script.  Then the students can either use the phone to speech, microphone to speech, or text to speech tools.  The text to speech tool would be great to use for students who may have a disability that makes it difficult to speak or even students who are shy.  Always remind your students to “Save” their speaking after they are finished recording it.

When the students are done creating their avatar, they can then publish the avatar.  One great feature of this site is that to publish the avatar there is no need for students to create an account.  However, if they want to save the character and be able to go back and make changes, they will need to make an account.  Students need to be at least 13 to create an account.  When they publish their avatar, there are literally hundreds of ways to share them.  The most simple way is to save  are to email it, publish it to an already created website via the embed code, or to post it to a social networking or blogging site that has already been established and is approved and secure

Have you tried Voki?  Feel free to share the links of your Voki avatars!

Article By Laura Ketcham

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