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Tag Archives | reading

Basic Medical Terms | Flashcards | Interactive Terms

Seeing a real life application as a way of learning new terms is a great learning tool for students with special needs. Flashcards are a great way for these students to practice and learn everyday terms and uses. MangoMon offers a great mix of vocational and occupational vocabulary terms that are ideal for in school or after school practice. The best part is that the flashcards are 100% free!

Basic Medical Terms

In this set of flashcards, students can interactively practice and learn terms about basic medical terms. These terms are important for students to learn because these are incidents or examples of things that could easily happen to anyone and are important for students to be able to identify if it would occur to them in an accident.

The vocabulary sets are complete with real photos, audio and examples of how the terms are used in a sentence. These real life applications are great for preparing students with examples of what they might come across during a medical emergency.

These terms can help children recognize and learn the names of different basic medical terms. There are nine vocabulary terms in this set. Words like fever, bruise and fracture are some of the examples of words in this set.

These flashcards work great with older students with special needs as well as in ESL classrooms. The audio aspect of the words and colorful and interactive interfaces will help students have fun while learning the words. With the arrow keys, they also have the power to go back and forth if they want to review terms again and again.

Because each vocabulary term is accompanied by pictures and sentences, students can better understand the meaning of the words. This is just another great free resource to help students with special needs and integrate technology into the classroom.

Free Teacher Resources | Special Education by MangoMon

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Food Preparation | Interactive Flashcards | Interactive Terms

For students with special needs, sometimes seeing a real life application can help them when learning new terms. Flashcards are a great way for special needs students to practice and learn everyday vocabulary. MangoMon offers a variety of vocational and occupational vocabulary terms that are great for in school or after school practice. These flashcards are 100% free and perfect for educational or personal use!

Food Preparation

In this set of interactive flashcards, students can practice and learn terms about food preparation. Such terms are important for students to learn because eating and preparing food is something we all do everyday.

The vocabulary sets are complete with real pictures, audio and examples of how the sentences are used in a sentence. These real life applications are great for preparing students with examples of how they would prepare food in their everyday lives.

These terms can help children recognize and learn the names of different kinds of food preparation. There are ten vocabulary terms in this set. Words like preheat, freeze and drain are just a few examples of the types of words in this set.

These flashcards work great with older students with special needs as well as in ESL classrooms. The audio portion of the words and colorful and engaging interfaces will help students enjoy the lessons. With the arrow keys, they also have the ability to go back and forth if they want to review a term or if they missed one.

Because each vocabulary term is accompanied by photos and sentences, students can better understand the meaning of the words. This is just another great free resource to help students with special needs.

Vocational and Occupational Flashcards by MangoMon

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Interactive Terms – Special Needs Flashcards

Seeing how a terms or words are actually used in everyday life is an important task for students with special needs. If they are able to see and imagine how terms are applied, they may have a better understanding of the meaning and may have an easier time remembering them. MangoMon offers a variety of vocational and occupational vocabulary terms that are perfect for using in school or after school. The free flashcards are a great supplement for educational or home usage!

Basic Medical Terms

In this particular set of flashcards, students are able to practice words that deal with basic medical terms. Words like these are important for students to learn because these are things that could easily happen to anyone and students should know how to identify them if it occurs during an accident.

The set of words are accompanied by real pictures, audio and real uses of how the words are used in a sentence. These real life applications are great for preparing students with examples of what they might come across during a medical emergency.

These terms are a great basis for helping students recognize and learn the names of different basic medical terms. There are nine vocabulary terms in this set. Words like fever, bruise and fracture are just a few examples of the words in this unit.

These flashcards work great with transitional students with special needs as well as in ESL students. The audio aspect of the words and colorful designs will help engage students in the lessons. Clickable arrow keys allow students to go back and forth if they want to review a term or if they missed one.

With photos and audio to go along with real life sentences, students can better understand the meaning and usage of words. Interactive flashcards like these are just another free resource to help students with special needs.

Vocational and Occupational Flashcards by MangoMon

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Simple Storytelling for Special Education Students with Storybird

About us: a peek inside Storybird on Storybird

Creating engaging, interactive stories has never been this simple. Storybird is a free online service for families, friends, teachers, and students to collaborate in creating short, visual stories together that can easily be shared, embedded or printed.The fun and simple tools provided by the website make it easy for students of all ability levels to create short, visual stories in a kid-friendly environment.

To begin, simply search by artwork or theme. For example, if your student loves tigers he or she can search for tigers and all tiger artwork will appear on the screen. This provides an easy story starter for reluctant writers. Stories can be written by one person or two or more people in a round robin fashion and can be shared privately or publicly. Publishing with Storybird is “global, viral, and instantaneous” which provides extra motivation for struggling authors.

Once your student selects a topic and the artwork appears, start a Storybird by writing a few words or a sentence and easily dragging and dropping a few images from the digital desktop.This format is great for students just learning how to write sentences or fluent writers working on enhancing their writing skills.

If students are working together, the next person – sitting side-by-side or across the world, can take their turn, adding words and pictures. Collaboration continues until the story is ready to share and publish. If the story is public, users can comment on the story, share with friends, or embed on their website.

How can Storybird benefit my classroom?

The website says it best, “Storybird promotes imagination, literacy, and self-confidence. Kids who play with words and pictures early in life tend to score higher in cognitive and aptitude tests later on. They read and draw more, and are better able to understand concepts and ideas. Plus, they become comfortable with the act of creation: turning nothing into something. In an idea-based society, that’s a key advantage.”

The original purpose of Storybird was to reconnect families in storytelling, even families miles apart have the opportunity to read, write, or share stories together. In the eyes of an special education teacher, Storybird is also an amazing tool for motivating struggling authors by providing an audience for storytelling, a platform for publishing, and an interactive and exciting venue for collaboration. Teacherscan use Storybird for independent or collaborative story creation in Writer’s Workshop and as a library of kid-friendly, visual literature to use for read alouds, reader’s workshop, etc.

How can I get started?

Ready to get started? View the how-to video below or register at www.storybird.com.

Storybird Quick Tour from Storybird on Vimeo.

Article By Amanda Kenuam

Free Stories for Kids and Reading Games by Learning Today

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Digital Learning – Special Needs Flashcards

For students with special needs, sometimes seeing a real life application can help them when learning new terms. Flashcards are a great way for special needs students to practice and learn everyday vocabulary. MangoMon offers a variety of vocational and occupational vocabulary terms that are great for in school or after school practice. These flashcards are 100% free and perfect for educational or personal use!

 

In this set of interactive flashcards, students can practice and learn computer parts. Computer terms are important for students to learn now that so many of the things they do in and out of school involve these items.

The vocabulary sets are complete with real pictures, audio and examples of how the sentences are used in a sentence. These real life applications are great for preparing students with examples of how they would use these computer parts in their everyday lives.

These terms can help children recognize and learn the names of different kinds of computer parts. There are nine vocabulary terms in this set. Words like monitor, CPU tower and keyboard are just a few examples of the types of words in this set.

These flashcards work great with older students with special needs as well as in ESL classrooms. The audio portion of the words and colorful and engaging interfaces will help students enjoy the lessons. With the arrow keys, they also have the ability to go back and forth if they want to review a term or if they missed one.

Because each vocabulary term is accompanied by photos and sentences, students can better understand the meaning of the words. This is just another great free resource to help students with special needs.

Vocational and Occupational Flashcards by MangoMon

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Audio Books in the Classroom

While working with 3rd grade students one summer, I realized the benefit of using audio books in the classroom.  The major focus of the summer program was for remediation in reading and mathematics and to better prepare the students for the next grade level.  As one of the requirements, the students had to complete summer reading and book reports both on assigned and free choice books.

There was one student, in particular, that was reading below grade level and was becoming very frustrated with reading.  He would refuse to read at all, only wanting to be read to by me or other students.  He would not join in on ‘pop corn’ reading sessions, he would just sit and not read during silent reading time, and he even refused to follow along in the book if he was being read to by a teacher or fellow students.  I tried so many different strategies to encourage and provide him with the skills to be a successful reader.

One weekend, after a particularly hard week, I knew I had to think of a strategy that would encourage this student to read.  The following Monday, the students would start to read the mandatory reading assignment, Tales of the Fourth Grade Nothing.  I reflected back to my children’s literature course that I had taken just a few months earlier and decided that possibly an audio book would help.  I went to my library and was able to pick up a copy of Tales of the Fourth Grade Nothing on CD.  When I got to class on Monday and we started our reading block, I called the student over to the CD player (with fuzzy headphones attached) I had set up on a desk in the classroom.  I told him that I was going to allow him to listen to the book on the CD.  He was very excited!  However, I threw in one little catch – I told him I would only let him listen to the story on CD if he also followed along, reading the words silently as they were read to him.  I also gave him a pencil, turned it around to the eraser side, and then told him he could use the pencil to help him to follow the words in the story.

After each chapter I asked him to pause the CD.  I would then verbally ask him the comprehension questions on what was covered in the chapter and also to summarize what the chapter was about and how the story had changed.  He then would write down his answers on the worksheets.  I was so surprised to see how much he retained using this strategy!  The worksheets were then used to help him to write his book report.  For the book report the students had a variety of projects they could complete.  He decided to make a book jacket including a story summary on the back.  I won’t say it was easy for him to complete, but he had made it through one of his first chapter books successfully. He was able to complete the project more independently than he had on any other assignment up to that point during the summer program.

This then spurred him to check out classroom books to take home.  He used the same strategy I taught him in class.  Either he would ask his mother to get the book on CD from the library or his mother or older sister would read to him, but he would always follow along in the book reading with them.  This positive experience allowed him to understand the magic of reading!

Free Audio Books

Most popular children’s books (including Newberry Award Winners) can be found on CD at your local library and checked out for free.  They can easily be transferred from CD to a digital format to be used on an MP3 Player.

Free audio books can also be found online.  These audio books are of books that are part of public domain and no longer under copyrights.  Some examples are Call of the Wild, Anne of Green Gables, 2000 Leagues Under the Sea, and Tom Sawyer.

Audio Books for Free

Buying Audio Books Online

Many stores, online and off-line, sell children’s books on CD or on a digital format for an MP3 player.  Below is a list of resources where you can purchase audio books for your classroom.

Audible

iTunes

Barnes & Noble

Borders

Article by Laura Ketcham

Photo by Basykes

Free Teacher Resources | Special Education by MangoMon by MangoMon

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Online Special Education Resources from FDLRS/TECH

Funded by the Florida Department of Education, FDLRS/TECH is a great site for free and low-cost technology resources for use in the special education classroom.  These online resources are intended to increase student performance and provide tools that can then easily be translated from the classroom to the real world.

The FDLRS/TECH website is broken down into eight categories:  c.  Each category contains a description of the topic (including Florida Standards) with a series of links that are broken down into respective categories.  FDRLS/TECH provides a wealth of useful free and low-cost resources for students and teachers that you should definitely check out.

Below is a list of just a few of my favorite resources from this site:

Creativity:  Music

Jam Trax is a music program developed by Sony for children in elementary and middle school.  The program allows students to add musical tracks of a variety of instruments to create their own songs.  It also provides an option for students to create their own tracks through the use of a microphone.  This program definitely spurs musical creativity.

Science

PBS NOVA is a top-rated science television series.  The website extends the television series by providing articles, interviews, essays, slide shows, photographs, and other interactive features.  These extra features allow for students to delve deeper into what is covered on their television shows.

Math

Illuminations provides free online virtual math activities and lessons.  This would be great for a center activity or computer lab time.  The activities are very engaging for all types of learners.

Writing

Bubbl.us is free online mapping software. Students I have taught, ranging from elementary to high school, use this for concept webs on research papers and presentations.

Reading

Free online storybooks are available from Children’s Storybooks Online.  There are a variety of online books for different age groups. Use a projector to show them to all your students. Some of them even incorporate sound effects to make the books come alive!

Article by Laura Ketcham

Free Teacher Resources | Special Education by MangoMon by MangoMon

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iCan. Using iPods for Special Needs Students

iPods. We see students using them everywhere. On the bus. In the home. At the park. Are we ready to see them in the classroom?

The Special School District of Saint Louis County has taken that well-known device and integrated it into the classroom. Since students are already using iPods so much throughout the day, they wanted to offer a more positive and educational use for the device in the classroom.

Vicki Nelson, a special education teacher, is a strong advocate of using technology with students with special needs. Starting with iPods, she sent home training information for the communication devices. She explained how parents can access the iPod and use it for building vocabulary skills and reading comprehension.

By adding video and audio lessons onto the iPods for the students and parents to be able to access at home, she noticed her students were starting to recognize material she hadn’t yet taught in the classroom. She then started using the iPods with children who had to use sign language. She had another teacher interpret stories using the iPod as a video portfolio. They were able to shoot video of themselves and the students performing a specific skill and then send it home to the parents.

The iPods were also serving as a replacement for written communication logs between staff and parents. By recording a simple voice memo, teachers can quickly record messages about each student. These messages can then be downloaded from iPod and saved for future references.

Vicki Nelson noticed that her own students had improved skills and vocabulary knowledge. They had a better ability to comprehend stories, too. Because the students were able to take these videos or audio clips home, they were becoming more familiar with the terms they were using everyday. The students were engaged and involved while using this technology. Parents loved the iPods because they were using compatible signs and could use extra reinforcement at home.

This is just another example of integrating technology into the classroom to help students with special needs. With technology constantly updating, it is important that students of all needs are being involved.

Free Teacher Resources | Special Education by MangoMon

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